Myanmar

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Additional Information
Capital Naypyidaw
Currency
Timezone Asia/Thimphu
Total States 7
Airport City
Ruling Type Government
Offical Languages Burmese, Shan, Karen, Kachin, Chin
National Animal Green peafowl
Food Tea leaf salad, Shan-style rice, Mohinga
Seasons Autumn  : Sep - Dec
Summer : Jun - Sep
Winter     : Dec - Mar
Sprint      : Mar - Jun


Destination



1 ) Yangon
Popular - Capital City     Location - Yangon, -Yangon, -Myanmar

Yangon boasts the largest number of colonial-era buildings in Southeast Asia, and has a unique colonial-era urban core that is remarkably intact. The colonial-era commercial core is centred around the Sule Pagoda, which is reputed to be over 2,000 years old. The city is also home to the gilded Shwedagon Pagoda – Myanmar's most sacred Buddhist pagoda. The mausoleum of the last Mughal Emperor is located in Yangon, where he had been exiled following the Indian Mutiny of 1857.

Yangon suffers from deeply inadequate infrastructure, especially compared to other major cities in Southeast Asia. Though many historic residential and commercial buildings have been renovated throughout central Yangon, most satellite towns that ring the city continue to be profoundly impoverished and lack basic infrastructure.


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2 ) Nay Pyi Taw
Popular - Historical     Location - Nay Pyi Taw, -Nay Pyi Taw, -Myanmar

Naypyidaw, city, capital of Myanmar (Burma). Nay Pyi Taw was built in the central basin of Myanmar in the early 21st century to serve as the country’s new administrative centre.

In 2004 construction of Nay Pyi Taw began on an isolated site near the city of Pyinmana, some 200 miles (320 km) north of the then capital city of Yangon (formerly Rangoon). Holding that relocation of the capital would facilitate accessibility of the government from all parts of the country, the administration began its move in 2005, first to Pyinmana and then to Nay Pyi Taw, which was proclaimed the capital in March 2006. In its early years Nay Pyi Taw consisted of little more than government buildings, luxury hotels, apartments, and an airport, and it was populated primarily by civil servants, many of whose families remained in Yangon because of the lack of shops, restaurants, and other amenities in the new capital. Despite its limited facilities, the burgeoning city was provided with an uninterrupted supply of electricity—a rarity elsewhere in the country. Use of the airport at Nay Pyi Taw generally has been restricted to military personnel; otherwise, the city is accessible by road or by rail (with a station at nearby Pyinmana) from Yangon.


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3 ) Mandalay
Popular - Architecture     Location - Mandalay, -Mandalay, -Myanmar

Mandalay is a city and former royal capital in northern Myanmar (formerly Burma) on the Irrawaddy River. In its center is the restored Mandalay Palace from the Konbaung Dynasty, surrounded by a moat. Mandalay Hill provides views of the city from its summit, which is reached by covered stairway. At its foot, the Kuthodaw Pagoda houses hundreds of Buddhist-scripture-inscribed marble slabs.

Mandalay was founded in 1857 by King Mindon, replacing Amarapura as the new royal capital of the Konbaung dynasty. It was Burma's final royal capital before the kingdom's annexation by the British Empire in 1885. Under British rule, Mandalay remained commercially and culturally important despite the rise of Yangon, the new capital of British Burma. The city suffered extensive destruction during the Japanese conquest of Burma in the Second World War. In 1948, Mandalay became part of the newly independent Union of Burma.

Today, Mandalay is the economic centre of Upper Myanmar and considered the centre of Burmese culture. A continuing influx of Chinese immigrants, mostly from Yunnan, in the past 20 years, has reshaped the city's ethnic makeup and increased commerce with China. Despite Naypyidaw's recent rise, Mandalay remains Upper Burma's main commercial, educational and health center.


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4 ) Bago
Popular - City of Sculptures     Location - Bago, -Kayin, -Myanmar

Bago  formerly known as Hanthawaddy , is a city and the capital of the Bago Region in Myanmar. It is located 91 kilometres (57 mi) north-east of Yangon.

Various Mon language chronicles report widely divergent foundation dates of Bago, ranging from 573 CE to 1152  while the Zabu Kuncha, an early 15th century Burmese administrative treatise, states that Pegu was founded in 1276/77 CE. The earliest extant evidence of Pegu as a place dates only to the late Pagan period (1212 and 1266) when it was still a small town, not even a provincial capital. After the collapse of the Pagan Empire, Bago became part of the breakaway Kingdom of Martaban by the 1290s.

The small settlement grew increasingly important in the 14th century as the region became most populous in the Mon-speaking kingdom. In 1369, King Binnya U made Bago the capital. The city remained the capital until the kingdom's fall in 1538.


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5 ) Bagan
Popular - Arts and Cultural     Location - Bagan, -Mandalay, -Myanmar

Bagan is an ancient city in central Myanmar (formerly Burma), southwest of Mandalay. Standing on the eastern banks of the Ayeyarwady River, it’s known for the Bagan Archaeological Area, where more than 2,000 Buddhist monuments tower over green plains. Holy sites around Old Bagan include ornate Ananda Temple, built in 1091 and topped with a golden stupa. Nearby is the vast 12th-century Dhammayangyi Temple.

Bagan is an ancient city and a UNESCO World Heritage Site located in the Mandalay Region of Myanmar. From the 9th to 13th centuries, the city was the capital of the Pagan Kingdom, the first kingdom that unified the regions that would later constitute modern Myanmar. During the kingdom's height between the 11th and 13th centuries, 4,446 Buddhist temples, pagodas and monasteries were constructed in the Bagan plains alone, of which the remains of 3822 temples and pagodas still survive to the present day. Now Bagan is one of the UNESCO world heritage sites. The Bagan Archaeological Zone is a main attraction for the country's nascent tourism industry.It is the largest archaeological site in the world.

Bagan sunrises are truly breathtaking and, watching the sun light up the Bagan temple plain, is an iconic Myanmar moment. The temples stretch as far as the eye can see, a morning mist rises over the plain, a rainbow coloured sky emerges through the darkness and hot air balloons drift over the horizon.

 


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6 ) Burma
Popular - Arts and Cultural     Location - Burma, -Mon, -Myanmar

Kyaiktiyo Pagoda is a well-known Buddhist pilgrimage site in Mon State, Burma. It is a small pagoda built on the top of a granite boulder covered with gold leaves pasted on by its male devotees. According to legend, the Golden Rock itself is precariously perched on a strand of the Buddha's hair.

According to legend, the Golden Rock itself is precariously perched on a strand of the Buddha's hair. The balancing rock seems to defy gravity, as it perpetually appears to be on the verge of rolling down the hill. The rock and the pagoda are at the top of Mt. Kyaiktiyo. Another legend states that a Buddhist priest impressed the celestial king with his asceticism and the celestial king used his supernatural powers to carry the rock to its current place, specifically choosing the rock as the resemblance to the monks head. It is the third most important Buddhist pilgrimage site in Burma after the Shwedagon Pagoda and the Mahamuni Pagoda.

The legend associated with the pagoda is that the Buddha, on one of his many visits, gave a strand of his hair to Taik Tha, a hermit. The hermit, who had tucked it in the tuft of his hair safely, in turn gave the strand to the king, with the wish that the hair be enshrined in a boulder shaped like the hermit's head. The king had inherited supernatural powers from his father Zawgyi, a proficient alchemist), and his mother, a naga serpent dragon princess. They found the rock at the bottom of the sea. With the help of the Thagyamin, the king of Tawadeintha Heaven in Buddhist cosmology, found the perfect place at Kyaiktiyo for locating the golden rock and built a pagoda, where the strand was enshrined. It is this strand of hair that, according to the legend, prevents the rock from tumbling down the hill. The boat, which was used to transport the rock, turned into a stone. This is also worshiped by pilgrims at a location about 300 metres (980 ft) from the golden rock. It is known as the Kyaukthanban Pagoda or stupa.


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7 ) Taunggyi
Popular - Lake     Location - Taunggyi, -Shan, -Myanmar

One of Myanmar’s most spectacular pagodas, Kakku is a Shan State hidden gem ane of the most incredible things to do at Inle Lake. It is a collection of 2,478 stupas commissioned 2,000 years ago and it is a religious centre for the Pa’O people, a Buddhist tribe from Myanmar.

Inle Lake is in the Shan Hills of Myanmar. At its southwestern edge, Phaung Daw Oo Paya is a tiered pagoda with gilded Buddha statues. In the hills, near the market town of Indein, the stupas of Shwe Inn Dein Pagoda resemble a field of gold spires. The ruined stupas at nearby Nyaung Ohak have been reclaimed by forest. Maing Thauk village is split between land and water, with a wooden bridge connecting the two halves.

The watershed area for the lake lies to a large extent to the north and west of the lake. The lake drains through the Nam Pilu or Balu Chaung on its southern end. There is also a hot spring on its northwestern shore.

Although the lake is not large, it contains a number of endemic species. Over twenty species of snails and nine species of fish are found nowhere else in the world. Some of these, like the silver-blue scaleless Sawbwa barb, the crossbanded dwarf danio, and the Lake Inle danio, are of minor commercial importance for the aquarium trade. It hosts approximately 20,000 brown and black head migratory seagulls in November, December and January

 


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Activity



1 ) Shwedagon Pagoda
Activity Duration - 4am – 10pm     Activity Category - Temple / Mosque / Church

The Shwedagon Pagoda is a Buddhist temple in Yangon, Myanmar and is an important Buddhist monument. ... This building preserves four Buddhist relics that belonged to the previous incarnations of Buddha and is an important temple for the Theravada tradition of Buddhism and for the people of Myanmar.

Shwedagon Pagoda is the most sacred Buddhist pagoda in Myanmar, as it is believed to contain relics of the four previous Buddhas of the present kalpa. These relics include the staff of Kakusandha, the water filter of Koṇāgamana, a piece of the robe of Kassapa, and eight strands of hair from the head of Gautama.


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2 ) Sule Pagoda (Sule Paya)
Activity Duration - 5am – 10pm     Activity Category - Attraction

The Sule Pagoda is a Burmese stupa located in the heart of downtown Yangon, occupying the centre of the city and an important space in contemporary Burmese politics, ideology and geography. According to legend, it was built before the Shwedagon Pagoda during the time of the Buddha, making it more than 2,600 years old. Burmese legend states that the site for the Shwedagon Pagoda was asked to be revealed from an old nat who resided at the place where the Sule Pagoda now stands.

The Sule Pagoda has been the focal point of both Yangon and Burmese politics. It has served as a rallying point in both the 1988 uprisings and 2007 Saffron Revolution.


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3 ) Yangon Circular Train (Circle Line)
Activity Category - Railway

Yangon Circular Railway  is the local commuter rail network that serves the Yangon metropolitan area. Operated by Myanmar Railways, the 45.9-kilometre (28.5 mi) 39-station loop system connects satellite towns and suburban areas to the city. Circa 2008–2010, the railway had about 200 coaches, had 20 daily runs, and sold 100,000 to 150,000 tickets daily.] The loop, which takes about three hours to complete, is a way to see a cross section of life in Yangon. The Railway is heavily utilized by lower-income commuters, as it is (along with buses) the cheapest method of transportation in Yangon.

The hours of service have been consistent over the years, from 3:45 am to 10:15 pm daily. In 2011, the cost of a ticket for a distance of 15 miles was two hundred kyats (~eighteen US cents), and that for over 15 miles was four hundred kyats (~37 US cents).In the new currency (introduced in 2012) long distance tickets are 200 kyat (~20 US cents).


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4 ) Yangon City Hall
Activity Duration - 10am – 4pm     Activity Category - Palace

Yangon City Hall;  is the city hall of Yangon, the largest city of Burma, and the seat of the city's administrative body, Yangon City Development Committee (YCDC). The building is considered a fine example of syncretic Burmese architecture, featuring traditional tiered roofs called pyatthat, and was designed by Burmese architect U Tin, who also designed Central Railway Station. Construction began in 1926 and ended in 1936. The city hall occupies the former site of the Ripon Hall.

The city hall has been the focal point of several major political demonstrations, including a 1964 People's Peace Committee rally supported by Thakin Kodaw Hmaing, which attracted 200,000 people and was subsequently clamped down by the Socialist regime  and the site of several bombings, including one in 2000, 2008, and 2009.


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5 ) Taukkyan War Cemetery
Activity Duration - 8am – 4pm     Activity Category - War Cemetery

The Taukkyan War Cemetery is a cemetery for Allied soldiers from the British Commonwealth who died in battle in Burma during the Second World War. The cemetery is in the village of Taukkyan, about 25 kilometres (16 mi) north of Yangon on Pyay Road. It is maintained by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

The cemetery contains the graves of 6,374 soldiers who died in the Second World War, the graves of 52 soldiers who died in Burma during the First World War, and memorial pillars (The Rangoon Memorial) with the names of over 27,000 Commonwealth soldiers who died in Burma during the Second World War in the Burma Campaign but who have no known grave. There are 867 graves that contain the remains of unidentified soldiers. It is one of the most visited and high rated war sites of all Asia.


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6 ) Mahamuni Buddha Temple
Activity Duration - 6am – 8pm     Activity Category - Temple / Mosque / Church

The Mahamuni Buddha Temple also called the Mahamuni Image) is a Buddhist temple and major pilgrimage site, located southwest of Mandalay, Myanmar (Burma) (Myanmar). The Mahamuni Buddha image (literal meaning: The Great Sage) is deified in this temple, and originally came from Arakan. It is highly venerated in Burma and central to many people's lives, as it is seen as an expression of representing the Buddha's life.

Ancient tradition refers to only five likenesses of the Buddha, made during his lifetime; two were in India, two in paradise, and the fifth is the Mahamuni Buddha image in Myanmar. According to the legend, the Buddha visited the Dhanyawadi city of Arakan in 554 BC. King Sanda Thuriya requested that an image was cast of him. After casting the Great Image, the Buddha breathed upon it, and thereafter the image became the exact likeness of the Mahamuni.


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Festival

1 ) Kachin Manaw Festival

Festival Month - January

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